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How to Increase Soundproofing for Windows in Washington DC

How to Increase Soundproofing for Windows in Washington DC

Your Washington DC home is meant to be a calming escape from the day-to-day grind. It’s hard to keep that in mind when you’re dealing with unwelcome sound from the world outside of your home.

Maybe you can’t get well rested because your neighbor’s loud dog is an early bird. Or maybe annoying traffic sounds are bothering an afternoon set aside for reading.

All that outside noise isn’t just annoying. It’s harmful to your well-being. From climbing stress levels to broken sleep schedules, extensive exposure to a lot of noise can have real health effects. And that’s not even acknowledging the damage it can do to your hearing.

What’s even worse than what harmful sound can do to your health? It’s a major prevalence in the normal lives of Americans. A study done in 2017 by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics discovered that 97% of the U.S. population is exposed to harmful levels of noise.1

What Can I Do to Decrease Outdoor Noise in My Space?

If you want to decrease the noise in your home, there are a number of soundproofing solutions you can try on your own. From window treatments to making a cover, here’s what you can do yourself to produce a quieter environment.

  • Try New Interior Design.

    You can make a large difference without changing the foundation of your home. Try adding some weighty blackout curtains to dampen noise. A rug on wood floors can stop sound waves and prevent echoing. Wall hangings—like art or tapestries—can make a difference too. And these items are uncomplicated to install. Read more from a design expert here.
  • Add Soundproof Curtains.

    If other measures just aren’t making a difference, you can try using more radical soundproofing options. Soundproof curtains can make a difference, but they’re heavy and can be difficult to maneuver. You can also add a glass sound barrier to your current window with a soundproofing kit—but you need to double check it’s a perfect fit to block out noise pollution. You can also cover the windows in your home with soundproof blankets or sound-blocking acoustic panels, but you won’t be able to use your windows for a view and sunlight.

What Can Pella Do to Help?

While there are some DIY responses that can help with noise reduction, sometimes the best investment is new windows. They’re a more long-term solution—and they’re a lot nicer looking than your other options.

With the Pella® Lifestyle Series, multiple panes of glass create a barrier between your home and the noise outside. And with performance options that reduce 52% more sound than single-pane windows, you’ll be able to relax better than ever before.2

Besides its soundproofing ability, our windows offer another advantage in energy efficiency. While adding curtains or sealing gaps can also give you a hand in keeping energy costs from climbing, very few solutions can stand up to the Pella Lifestyle Series. In fact, the Pella Lifestyle Series has an option that is on average 83% more energy efficient than single-pane windows.3

If you’re tired of working with unwanted noise from outside your home, Pella of Washington DC can help. We’ll walk you through your window choices to reduce sound and help you find the solution that works for your home. Give us a call at (202) 810-6799 or stop by our Pella Showroom.

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1 Bureau of Transportation Statistics, 2017.
2Reduction in sound based on OITC ratings of Pella Lifestyle Series windows with respective performance package compared to a single-pane wood or vinyl window with an OITC of 19. Calculated by using the sound transmission loss values in the 80 to 4000 Hz range as measured in accordance with ASTM E-90(09). Actual results may vary.
3Window energy efficiency calculated in a computer simulation using RESFEN 6.0 default parameters for a 2000-square-foot new construction single-story home when Pella Lifestyle Series windows with the respective performance package are compared to a single-pane wood or vinyl window. The energy efficiency and actual savings will vary by location. The average window energy efficiency is based on a national average of 94 modeled cities across the country and weighting based on population. For more details see pella.com/methodology.

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